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 Famous Designers

Paris-born Philippe Patrick Starck (b. 1949) has a wide range of design, but is very well known for his consumer goods and interiors. He was educated in Paris at the École Camondo and founded his first design firm, which specialized in inflatable objects, in 1968. The next year, he became art director of his firm along with Pierre Cardin. He has worked both independently as an interior designer and as a product designer since 1975. After designing the private apartment interiors for French President François Mitterrand in 1982, his career began to climb significantly. In 1986 he joined Domus Academy Department of Design as an associate lecturer. Two of Starck's famous designs include stylized toothbrushes (1989) and a sleek juicer dubbed the Juicy Salif created for Alessi in 1990. The Juicy Salif has become an affordable and popular cult item.

Philippe Patrick Starck
Charles and Ray Eames

Husband and wife team Charles (1907-1978) and Ray (1912-1988) Eames played a major role in the world of modern architecture and furniture, as well as working in industrial and graphic design, fine art, and film. Charles completed two years of study at Washington University in St. Louis. With his design and life partner Ray, he designed prize-winning furniture that expanded upon the wood molding techniques of Alvar Aalto. Ray-Bernice Alexandra Kaiser Eames began as an abstract expressionist painter, having graduated from Bennett Women’s College in Millbrook, NY and later studying under Hans Hoffman while living in New York City. She co-founded the American Abstract Artists and has a painting in the Whitney museum’s permanent collection.


Le Corbusier

Le Corbusier, whose birth name was Charles-Édouard Jeanneret (1887-1965), was not only a pioneer of modern architecture, but also an architect, designer, urbanist, and writer. He was born in Switzerland and became a French citizen in 1930. His career spanned five decades and his constructed buildings spanned Europe, India and America. He was an early proponent of modern high rise design and had a personal dedication to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities.
Verner Panton (1926 – 1998) of Denmark created innovative, futuristic designs in vibrant colors with a variety of materials, especially plastic. Though his style was very "1960s," he regained popularity at the end of the 20th century. As of 2004, his most of his well-known furniture models are still in production. Already an experienced artist, Panton studied architecture at the Royal Danish Academy of Art in Copenhagen, graduating in 1951. During the first two years of his career, 1950–1952, he worked at the architectural practice of Arne Jacobsen, another Danish architect and furniture designer. Panton started his own design and architectural office and became well known for his innovative architectural proposals, including a collapsible house (1955), the Cardboard House and the Plastic House (1960). In the mid-1950's, Panton converted a Volkswagen bus into a mobile studio and travelled across Europe. He returned to Denmark in 1958 full of unconventional ideas, one of which evolved into the iconic Heart Cone Chair. In 1960 Panton was the designer of the very first single-form injection-molded plastic chair. The Stacking chair or S chair, became his most famous design and was mass-produced.
Verner Panton

Hans Jorgensen Wegner
Hans Jorgensen Wegner’s (1914 - 2007) high-quality and thoughtful work contributed to the international popularity of mid-century Danish design. His style is often described as Organic Functionality, a modernist school with emphasis on functionality, arising primarily in Scandinavian countries. In his lifetime, he designed over 500 different chairs, over 100 of which were put into mass production, with many recognizable icons among them. Born to cobbler Peter M. Wegner, he worked as a child apprentice to Master cabinetmaker H. F. Stahlberg. With an affinity for wood, he attended the Danish School of Arts and Crafts and the Architectural Academy in Copenhagen. In 1936, he began studies at what is now The Danish Design School, with O. Mølgaard Nielsen as teacher.